sixpenceee:

And here they are:

Thermoception:  Ability to sense heat and cold. Thermoceptors in the brain are used for monitoring internal body temperature.

Proprioception: The sense of where your body parts are located relevant to each other. 

Chronoception: Sense of the passing of time. Your body has an internal clock. 

Equilibrioception:  The sense that allows you to keep your balance and sense body movement in terms of acceleration and directional changes. 

Magentoception:  This is the ability to detect magnetic fields. Unlike most birds, humans do not have a strong magentoception, however, experiments have demonstrated that we do tend to have some sense of magnetic fields. 

Tension Sensors:  These are found in such places as your muscles and allow the brain the ability to monitor muscle tension.

Nociception:  In a word, pain.  This was once thought to simply be the result of overloading other senses, such as “touch”, but it has it’s own unique sensory system.  There are three distinct types of pain receptors: cutaneous (skin), somatic (bones and joints), and visceral (body organs).

SOURCE

posted 1 day ago with 27985 notes (orig)
# writing   
I was wondering if you could describe the right reasons to kill off a character?
- Anonymous

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

There are plenty!

-To show that something is dangerous. If your band of six main characters fight the evil dragon and every single one of them survives, did they really fight that strong of a dragon? If the villain is after your character’s family and every family member makes it out alive, is the villain really that scary? Major character death is the only way to make a deadly threat actually seem legitimate.

-To show that actions have consequences. You know that trope where the hero defeats the villain in a city-destroying battle, but all the citizens made it out alive first (because, you know, everybody would be able to hear the news and get out in time *eyeroll*) so nobody innocent dies? That’s a terrible trope because it’s like the narrator is stepping in with an authorial washcloth to keep the hero’s hands clean. Sometimes even actions that end up good overall kill people, and it’s important to show that drastic measures have drastic results and that anything that affects millions of people is going to kill at least a few.

-Yes, sometimes as character development, though you should never, ever do this to the only major woman or minority character because that’s a nasty trope. And even if it’s a straight white dude being killed for character development, it’s important to avoid fridging and manpain tropes. You can do this by giving the character who gets killed other important things to do than getting killed, and focusing on the pain they go through rather than the pain others around them (especially men) go through. When a character who meets those requirements gets killed for character development, I never hear a thing about it being problematic. ESPECIALLY the “giving them other importance than getting killed/character development” part. That is the biggest key.

-Shannah

posted 4 days ago with 529 notes
# writing   
Write the kind of story you would like to read. People will give you all sorts of advice about writing, but if you are not writing something you like, no one else will like it either.
Meg Cabot  (via fictionwritingtips)
Diversity in Writing

elloellenoh:

I did this post for Write on Com. Figured it would be worth sharing here also.

Diversity in Writing

by author Ellen Oh

Recently, I was part of a conversation where an author said the following: “But there’s been a lot of anger from some quarters about “appropriation” and “exoticism” … I’m terrified of incurring the kind of wrath I’ve seen online, and have decided I’m not qualified to tackle diversity head on.”

Guys, if this is you, then I want to talk to you about why it is okay to “tackle diversity.” If you are the type to say, “Yes, I want to include diversity! I just don’t know how.” I want to talk to you too, because there are right ways and wrong ways to do it. But mostly I want to tell you how important it is that you all are trying. Thank you for that. Because I was once that little girl scanning through the books desperately looking for someone like me, who wasn’t a stereotype. And now I have kids who are doing the same thing. Thank you for wanting to have this conversation.

But if you are scared about being called out for including diversity in your book, then wake up and smell the diapers, children, because you are not going to be able to make everybody happy. Someone somewhere is going to be offended for something you wrote and for a reason that you never intended! You wrote a girl empowerment book? How dare you put down feminine girls! You wrote about sexual exploitation? How dare you write a slut shaming book! You wrote a POC main character? How dare you white person try and exploit minorities!

Look, I’m Korean American and I wrote a fantasy book based in ancient Korea. I studied it for 10 years on top of all that I knew from being raised by Korean immigrants. And yet I had plenty of people bash me for getting things “wrong” about Korean culture in my book – and most of them weren’t even Korean! So the one thing I can promise you with absolute assurance is, someone somewhere is going to be irate at you for writing. Whether it is the fact that you wrote a POC character or the fact that you are posing in your author picture with a hand to your cheek, someone is going to hate you for something. Listen, you are not ever going to make everyone happy. That’s just human nature. I bet someone out there is reading this post right now and pissed off at me just because they don’t like my face. What can you do? You can start not caring about making everybody happy.

Now writing about POC is a bit different in that most people are afraid of being called a racist. So they avoid diversity because of it. However, let me reassure you that by not including diversity, you are also being called a racist. Maybe not to your face, but you are. And guess what? Being called a racist is nowhere near as painful as dealing with actual racism.

Now that I have freed you from the fear of being reviled on the internet, let’s talk about a few things that you need to keep in mind:

  1. Do your research and be respectful. Don’t culturally appropriate from POC and then claim that your world is different therefore you can do whatever the hell you want with it. Call your world whatever you want, but if your world looks and sounds like China, and you even use Chinese words and architecture and terms specific to that culture, then don’t pretend it’s not China and mix us up with every other Asian culture. It just reeks of sloppy research and not giving a damn. If you want your world to feel Asian without specifically calling out a specific country, it can be done – see Eon/Eona. See The Last Airbender series.
  2. Avoid stereotypes. There are many. The magical negro, the blonde bimbo, the smart Asian math whiz, the ghetto talking black kid, the feisty Latina, the Asian dragon lady, the cryptic but wise Native American, the uppercrusty WASP, etc. Using stereotypes is lazy writing. You don’t want to invest in your character’s development to go beyond an easily recognizable trope. Don’t do this.
  3. Exotification of another culture. “But remember, there are two ways to dehumanize someone: by dismissing them, and by idolizing them.” ? David Wong. I think the context of this quote was about women and how men view them. But it works well in this context also. If you don’t include POC in your book, you are dismissing them. If you do include POC but make them exotic and other-worldish, you are going the other way. Neither is acceptable.
  4. Check your privilege. Don’t get mad that I used the “P” word. I know privilege can be a touchy subject. Asking you to be aware of your privilege is not the same as calling you a racist. What I’m doing is asking you to be aware of it. If you are a female, then you know that male privilege is very real. Take what you understand as male privilege and make a correlation to white privilege and you will see what I mean. And if it helps, read this: http://ted.coe.wayne.edu/ele3600/mcintosh.html
  5. Reach out to minorities for help.  If you know nothing about the culture that you want to include in your book, then reach out for help. Yes, you can find a lot of information on the internet, but some things you can only learn from people who live that culture 24/7.

It won’t be easy, and it shouldn’t be! You will probably make mistakes. And that’s ok! You’ll learn from them and you will fail less and less the more you try. But the most important thing is that you try. Because you are writing for kids. All our kids! And they need to see that their books can reflect their world.

posted 4 days ago with 1979 notes (orig)
# writing   
Staying Focused When Writing

whataboutwriting:

Also, do you have any tips on staying focused when writing?
  • Find a workplace. Some people can only work efficiently in certain places. Certain environments will boost your productivity, while others will completely ruin it. Find the places where you’re the most creative and/or when you can find staying focused easier. A place with little distractions will often work better, which brings me to our next point.
  • Eliminate all distractions. We live in a world where there’s too much happening, everywhere, at all times. Make sure you turn off the world while you’re writing. Turn off your phone, turn off the TV, put that book you’re eager to finish away from your sight. Stop checking Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, whatever. StayFocusd is a great tool for this. Check it out.
  • Make time for writing. If you are in a hurry, you’ll be so worried about when you have to go that you won’t be able to concentrate. If necessary, create a schedule and decide on the times you can dedicate exclusively to writing and don’t have to be in a hurry to anything after that. If this works for you, make sure you get done with all your obligations before you sit down to write again.
  • Does music help? It doesn’t help everyone, but it’s useful for some people. There are sounds that help you concentrate and even create a peaceful environment that gets you in the perfect mood to write. Here’s a playlist and here’s a website full of sounds that can work as ambient music. 
  • Take breaks. Studies show that people who take breaks can be a lot more productive, as concentration sort of wears out after a while if you don’t rest. Don’t try to write everything at once. Find how much time you can write without feeling tired and, when you do, don’t be afraid to take a break and enjoy a cup of coffee or a cup of tea. 

For further reading:

My story takes place in an otherworld setting where magic users make up about 1 to 2% of humans. Anywho, many of the magic users are noticeably marked because of their powers. This includes abnormal or vivid eye color and strange markings on their skin and unnatural hair color. I'm wondering if this is too cliche and overdone? How can I make it less cliche?
- Anonymous

clevergirlhelps:

A lot of authors choose mutations they can purple prose over to mark their magical characters. I’ve seen lots of magicians that have weird hair/eyes/tattoos … not so many with tentacle fingers, warts, or something creepy like eyes without whites. I don’t intend to force you away from your original idea, but it the commonness of aesthetically pleasing magic markers is something to keep in mind. 

I think it would be cool to have side effects that aren’t visual. For example:

  • A certain voice tone that all magic users have. It would be funny if all the magic users sounded like a six-year-old girl, but if you’re not aiming for the ridiculous, you maybe the voice sounds like that weird monotone people use to disguise their voice in videos.
  • Magicians are surrounded by their own background music. It’s very subtle, audible only to the magic user and people 0-2 feet away from them. The music changes based on emotions and type of magic wielded.
  • Magicians all smell a certain way. I’ve seen this a few times, but it’s always a minor trait or a result of tinkering in laboratories. Evil people tend to smell like brimstone and good people tend to smell like something flowery (women) or smokey/spicy (men). Choose your own scent.
  • Magician’s touch. You can detect a magician by the way their skin feels. Their skin may look normal, but touching it feels like touching scales or feathers or water or a live wire.

lastrplord:

Say What?! - The Many Faces and Meanings of Said (Requested)

First, let me clear up a rumor. Said is not dead. Said is very much alive. It’s a clever little word with an awesome ability - it can become invisible. Of all of the books I’ve read - and I’ve read many - I’ve never been jolted out of the fictional world because someone said something. That being said, it’s sometimes nice to switch things up and use different words, especially to convey a certain mood. That’s where this guide comes in. I’ve grouped many said synonyms into moods, and within those moods I’ve ranked them by how much emotion they convey. Onwards!

The Scale - little emotion, medium emotion, big emotion

Happily

joked, lilted, giggled, exclaimedlaughed, rejoiced, sang out, jabbered

Sadly

groaned, snivelled, cried, mourned, blubbered, wept, bawledagonized, lamented, sobbed

Angrily

asserted, retorted, ranted, snapped, growled, hissed, retorted, fumed, seethed, raged, thundered, roared, bellowed, snarled

Bossily

insisted, argued, bossed, dictated, professed, barked, yelled, demandedordered, shrieked

Pained

yelped, groaned, whimperedcried out, howled, screamed, shrieked, wailed, bellowed, roared

Scared

squeaked, gasped, whimpered, stammered, screeched, shrieked

Understanding

consoled, comforted, sympathised, agreed

Begging

beseeched, begged, implored, pleaded

Arguing

grumbled, huffed, countered, argued, disagreed, retorted, agreed

Other Ways To Say It

quipped, raved, sputtered, squawked, asked, answered, explained, inquired, posed, pressed, called, pried, whispered, proposed, yammered, queried, interrogated, replied, breathed, croaked, requested, murmured, responded, retorted, suggested, prayed, purred, hollered, blurted, mumbled, sighed, complained, jeered

In Which Diversity Isn’t a Myth

clementive:

Ok. I’m tired of the typical vampire, werewolf and fairy.I’m also tired of the occidental-centrism in mythology. Hence, this list. 

I tried to included as many cultural variants as I could find and think of. (Unfortunately, I was restricted by language. Some Russian creatures looked very interesting but I don’t speak Russian…) Please, add creatures from your culture when reblogguing (if not already present). It took me a while to gather all those sites but I know it could be more expansive. I intend on periodically editing this list. 

Of note: I did not include specific legendary creatures (Merlin, Pegasus, ect), gods/goddesses/deities and heroes.

  • Dragons

The Chinese Dragon

The Japanese Dragon

The Korean Dragon

The Vietnamese Dragon

The Greek Dragon

The Indian Dragon

The Polish Dragon

The Austrian Dragon

The British Dragon

The Ancient Dragon (Egypt, Babylon and Sumer)

The Spanish Basque Dragon

Of the Cockatrice (creature with the body of a dragon)

Alphabetical List of Dragons Across Myths (Great way to start)

  • Little creatures (without wings)

The Legend of the LeprechaunsThe Leprechaun

Chanaque /Alux (the equivalent of leprechauns in Aztec/Mayan folklore)

Elves

Elves in Mythology and Fantasy

Elves in Germanic Mythology

Kabeiroi or Cabeiri (Dwarf-like minor gods in Greek mythology)

Norse Dwarves

The Myth of Loki and the Dwarves

Ten Types of Goblins

Goblins

Tengu: Japanese Goblins

Gnomes 

More on Gnomes

Pooka: an Irish phantom

  • Creatures with wings (except dragons)

Fairies

All sorts of Cultural Fairies

Fairies in Old French Mythology 

A Fairy List

Bendith Y Mamau (Welsh fairies)

Welsh Fairies

Peri (Persian fairies)

Yü Nü (Chinese fairies)

The Celtic Pixie

Angels in Judaism

Angels in Christianity

Hierarchy of Angels

Angels in Islam

Irish Sylph

Garuda (Bird-like creature in Hindu and Buddhist myths)

Bean Nighe (a Scottish fairy; the equivalent of a banshee in Celtic mythology)

Harpies

  • Spirited Creatures

Druids

Jinn (Genies in Arabic folklore)

Types of Djinns

Aisha Qandisha and Djinn in Moroccan Folklore

Oni (demons in Japanese folklore)

Nymphs

Spirits in Asturian Mythology

Valkyries

Lesovik

Boggarts: The British Poltergeist

Phantom black dogs (the Grim)

Demons in Babylonian and Assyrian Mythology (list)

Demons in the Americas (list)

European Demons (list)

Middle-East and Asia Demons (list)

Judeo-Christian Demons (list)

Nephilim, more on Nephilim

Mahaha (a demon in Inuit mythology)

Flying Head (a demon in Iroquois mythology)

  • Ghosts

Toyol (a dead baby ghost in Malay folklore)

Malay Ghosts

Yuki-onna (a ghost in Japanese folklore)

The Pontianak (a ghost in Malay mythology)

Funayurei (a ghost in Japanese folklore)

Zagaz (ghosts in Moroccan folklore)

Japanese Ghosts

Mexican Ghosts

  • Horse-like mythical creatures

Chinese Unicorns

Unicorns

The Kelpie (Could have also fitted in the sea creatures category)

The Centaur

The Female Centaur

Hippocamps (sea horses in Greek mythology)

Horse-like creatures (a list)

Karkadann, more on the Karkadann (a persian unicorn)

Ceffyl Dwfr (fairy-like water horse creatures in Cymric mythology)

  • Undead creatures

The Melanesian Vampire 

The Ewe Myth : Vampires

The Germanic Alp

The Indonesian Vampire

Asanbosam and Sasabonsam (Vampires from West Africa)

The Aswang: The Filipino Vampire

Folklore Vampires Versus Literary Vampires

Callicantzaros: The Greek Vampire

Vampires in Malaysia

Loogaroo/Socouyant: The Haitian Vampire

Incubi and Sucubi Across Cultures

Varacolaci: The Romanian Vampire

Brahmaparusha: The Indian Vampire

Genesis of the Word “Vampire”

The Ghoul in Middle East Mythology

Slavic Vampires

Vampires A-Z

The Medical Truth Behind the Vampire Myths

Zombies in Haitian Culture

  • Shape-shifters and half-human creatures (except mermaids) 

Satyrs (half-man, half-goat)

Sirens in Greek Mythology (half-woman and half-bird creatures)

The Original Werewolf in Greek Mythology

Werewolves Across Cultures

Werewolf Syndrome: A Medical Explanation to the Myth

Nagas Across Cultures

The Kumiho (half fox and half woman creatures)

The Sphinx

Criosphinx

Scorpion Men (warriors from Babylonian mythology)

Pooka: an Irish changelings

Domovoi (a shape-shifter in Russian folklore)

Aatxe (Basque mythology; red bull that can shift in a human)

Yech (Native American folklore)

Ijiraat (shapeshifters in Inuit mythology)

  • Sea creatures

Selkies (Norse mermaids)

Mermaids in many cultures

More about mermaids

Mermen

The Kraken (a sea monster)

Nuckelavee (a Scottish elf who mainly lives in the sea)

Lamiak (sea nymphs in Basque mythology)

Bunyip (sea monster in Aboriginal mythology)

Apkallu/abgal (Sumerian mermen)

An assemblage of myths and legends on water and water creatures

Slavic Water Creatures

The Encantado (water spirits in Ancient Amazon River mythology)

Zin (water spirit in Nigerian folklore)

Qallupilluk (sea creatures in Inuit mythology)

  • Monsters That Don’t Fit in Any Other Category

Aigamuxa, more details on Aigamuxa

Amphisabaena

Abere

Bonnacon

Myrmidons (ant warriors)

TrollMore on Trolls

Golems 

Golems in Judaism

Giants: The Mystery and the Myth (50 min long documentary)

Inupasugjuk (giants in Inuit mythology)

Fomorians (an Irish divine race of giants)

The Minotaur

The ManticoreThe Manticore and The Leucrouta

The Ogre

The Orthus (two-headed serpent-tailed dog)

The Windigo

The Windigo Psychosis

Rakshasa (humanoids in Hindu and Buddhist mythology)

Yakshas (warriors in Hindu mythology)

Taqriaqsuit (“Shadow people” in Inuit mythology)

  • References on Folklore and Mythology Across the Globe

Creatures of Irish Folklore 

Folklore and Fairytales

An Overview of Persian Folklore

Filipino Folklore

Myths, Creatures and Folklore

Alaska Folklore

Spanish (Spain) Mythology

Mythical Archive

Mythology Dictionary

List of Medieval and Ancient Monsters

Native American Animals of Myth and Legends

Native American Myths

Bestiary of Ancient Greek Mythology

Mythology, Legend, Folklore and Ghosts

Angels and Demons

List of Sea Creatures

Yoruba Mythology

Ghosts Around the World, Ghosts From A to Z

Strange (Fantastic) Animals of Ancient Egypt

Egyptian Mythology

Creatures from West Africa

On the Legendary Creatures of Africa

Myths, Creatures and Folklore

  • References on writing a myth or mythical creatures

Writing a MYTHology in your novel?

How to Write a Myth

10 Steps to Creating Realistic Fantasy Creatures

Creating Fantasy Creatures or Alien Species

Legendary Creature Generator

Book Recommendations With Underrated Mythical Creatures

(I have stumbled upon web sites that believed some of these mythical creatures exist today… Especially dragons, in fact. I just had to share the love and scepticism.)

Guide: Describing Clothing and Appearance

writing-questions-answered:

When Describing a Character

DO:

  • provide enough detail to give the reader a sense of the character’s physical appearance 
  • highlight details that serve as clues to who the character is and perhaps what their life is like
  • describe clothing to establish character or when relevant to scene

DON’T:

  • go overboard with too many details or take up too much of the reader’s time describing one character
  • repetitively describe features or fixate on certain characteristics
  • describe clothing every time the character shows up unless its somehow relevant to the scene. 
  • describe minor characters’ clothing in-depth unless it’s relevant


Choose a Focal Point

When describing a character’s appearance, choose a focal point and work up or down from there. For example, you may describe them from head to toe, or from toe to head. Try not to skip around. If you’re describing their face, start with their hair and work your way down to their mouth, or start at the mouth and work your way up to their hair.


Describing Race and Ethnicity

There is a lot of debate about the right and wrong way to describe a person’s race. If you want, you can state that a person is Black, white, Hispanic, Native American, First Nations, Latino, Middle-Eastern, Asian, Pacific Islander, etc. Just remember that races are made up of different ethnic groups. Someone of Asian descent could be Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Vietnamese, etc. If you’re describing a character whose ethnicity is unknown or not important to the plot, you could just say that they were Asian or Black, for example. But, the rest of the time you need to be clear about whether they are Chinese, Chinese American, Korean, etc. Also, remember that not all Black people are African-American, such as someone born in England or Haiti, for example.

You may instead choose to describe a character’s race through the color of their hair, eyes, and skin. It’s up to you which you feel most comfortable with and is most appropriate for your story. Just remember, if you describe one character’s skin color or otherwise make an issue of their race, you should describe every character’s skin color or race.


Describing Clothing

Just like with physical appearance, when describing clothing you want to choose a focal point and work up or down. Think about things like the garments they’re wearing (pants, shirt, coat) and accessories (hat, jewelry, shoes). Be sure to choose clothing which are both relevant to your character and to the time and place where your story is set. You can find out about appropriate clothing by Googling the time and place your story is set plus the word clothing:

"Clothing in Victorian England"
"Clothing in 1960s New York"
"9th century Viking clothing"

Be sure to look for web sites that aren’t providing cheap Halloween costumes. Shops providing clothes for historical reenactors are often very accurate.


Looking for Inspiration

There are many resources online for both historical and modern clothing. For historical clothing, you can look for web sites about the period, web sites for or about historical reenactors, or web pages for historical enthusiasts or museums. For modern clothing, you can simply pull up the web site of your favorite department store or clothing designer. Choose an outfit that works for your character, then learn how to describe the relevant parts.


Resources for Describing Clothing:

Describing Clothing
Describing Clothes
Writing Tips on Describing Clothes
Describing Clothes and Appearance (If You Should at All)


Resources for Garments and Accessories:

Shirts
Trousers 
Dress
Types of Dress
Shorts
Briefs
Panties
Lingerie
Bra
Swimsuit
Pajamas
Shoes
Coats and Jackets
Sweaters
Hats
Jewelry
Sunglasses
Sleeves, Necklines, Collars, and Dress Types
Scarves for Men
Scarf Buying Guide
The Ultimate Scarf Tying Guide



Historical Clothing Resources:

OMG That Dress!
Period Fabric
Amazon Dry Goods
Reconstructing History
Historic Threads
Historical Costume Inspiration
History of Costume: European Fashion Through the Ages
Women’s Fashion Through the Years
Clothing in the Ancient World
Clothing in Ancient Rome
Clothing in Biblical Times
Vintage Fashion Guild



Modern Clothing Resources:

Clothes on Pinterest
Polyvore
Fashion Dictionary
This is a Fashion Blog
What I Wore
Fashion is Endless


Physical Details Resources:

Women’s Body Shapes
Men’s Body Shapes
Face Shapes
Realistic Eye Shape Chart
Facial Hair Types
How to Describe Women’s Hair Lengths
The Ultimate Haircut Guide for Women
Men’s Haircuts (Barber Shop Style)
A Primer on Men’s Hairstyles
Hair Color
Obsidian Bookshelf Hair Color
Obsidian Bookshelf Eye Color
Skin Color Chart
Curl and Texture Chart

posted 2 weeks ago with 10197 notes
# writing   
45 Things I Want to See More of in Stories

elumish:

  1. Characters with disabilities
  2. Soul mates with the issues of being stuck with someone for the rest of your life
  3. Soul mates where people end up getting outed against their will
  4. Soul mates for non-traditional-romantic relationships
  5. Functional families
  6. Functional non-romantic cross-gender friendships
  7. Friendships that fall apart and don’t fix themselves
  8. Sex that screws up relationships
  9. Romantic relationships without sex
  10. Sexual relationships without romantic attraction
  11. Love Vs where the best choice is neither of them
  12. Actual love triangles
  13. Bad decisions having real consequences
  14. Diverse groups of people
  15. Fantasy societies that are not homogenous
  16. Superpowers that are more of a burden than a gift
  17. Magic with consequences
  18. Dealing with magic being revealed to the world
  19. Showing the consequences magic has on the development of a society
  20. Interesting magic systems
  21. Modern retellings of non-European fairy tales
  22. GSRM people with importance beyond their sexuality
  23. The main character losing fights and then having to recover
  24. Having to train to acquire skills
  25. Failed relationships that end with friendships
  26. Main characters with happy childhoods
  27. People with unusual hobbies
  28. People who play sports who are more than just sport players
  29. People who play sports who dedicate their lives to their sport
  30. Religion saving characters
  31. Religion alienating characters
  32. Relationships despite religious differences
  33. Dealing with situations with no way out
  34. Dealing with other characters being in situations with no way out
  35. Rekindling old friendships
  36. Non-conventionally attractive characters who don’t become attractive
  37. Characters who never learn to live with themselves as they are
  38. Characters who learn to live with themselves as they are
  39. Characters doing bad things for the greater good, and having to face the consequences
  40. The government being the protagonist’s side
  41. Political intrigue with reasons other than love as the motivating factor
  42. High school with competent teachers
  43. Competent therapists/social workers
  44. Conspiracy theories that are really just theories
  45. Adult stories with realistic teenagers
What is up with “thy,” “thou,” “thee,” and “thine”?

theyuniversity:

image

image

image

image

image

characterdesigninspiration:

Quite a few people requested some form of trait/personality generator, and here’s the result!  I wanted to keep it vague enough that the options could work for any universe, be it modern, fantasy, scifi, or anything else, so these are really just the basics. Remember that a character is much more than a list of traits, and this should only be used as a starting point– I tried to include a variety of things, but further development is definitely a must.

Could pair well with the gender and sexuality generator.

To Play: Click and drag each gif, or if that isn’t working/you’re on mobile, just take a screenshot of the whole thing (multiple screenshots may be required if you want more than one trait from each category).

posted 3 weeks ago with 116662 notes (orig)
# writing   
Guide: Describing Clothing and Appearance

writing-questions-answered:

When Describing a Character

DO:

  • provide enough detail to give the reader a sense of the character’s physical appearance 
  • highlight details that serve as clues to who the character is and perhaps what their life is like
  • describe clothing to establish character or when relevant to scene

DON’T:

  • go overboard with too many details or take up too much of the reader’s time describing one character
  • repetitively describe features or fixate on certain characteristics
  • describe clothing every time the character shows up unless its somehow relevant to the scene. 
  • describe minor characters’ clothing in-depth unless it’s relevant


Choose a Focal Point

When describing a character’s appearance, choose a focal point and work up or down from there. For example, you may describe them from head to toe, or from toe to head. Try not to skip around. If you’re describing their face, start with their hair and work your way down to their mouth, or start at the mouth and work your way up to their hair.


Describing Race and Ethnicity

There is a lot of debate about the right and wrong way to describe a person’s race. If you want, you can state that a person is Black, white, Hispanic, Native American, First Nations, Latino, Middle-Eastern, Asian, Pacific Islander, etc. Just remember that races are made up of different ethnic groups. Someone of Asian descent could be Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Vietnamese, etc. If you’re describing a character whose ethnicity is unknown or not important to the plot, you could just say that they were Asian or Black, for example. But, the rest of the time you need to be clear about whether they are Chinese, Chinese American, Korean, etc. Also, remember that not all Black people are African-American, such as someone born in England or Haiti, for example.

You may instead choose to describe a character’s race through the color of their hair, eyes, and skin. It’s up to you which you feel most comfortable with and is most appropriate for your story. Just remember, if you describe one character’s skin color or otherwise make an issue of their race, you should describe every character’s skin color or race.


Describing Clothing

Just like with physical appearance, when describing clothing you want to choose a focal point and work up or down. Think about things like the garments they’re wearing (pants, shirt, coat) and accessories (hat, jewelry, shoes). Be sure to choose clothing which are both relevant to your character and to the time and place where your story is set. You can find out about appropriate clothing by Googling the time and place your story is set plus the word clothing:

"Clothing in Victorian England"
"Clothing in 1960s New York"
"9th century Viking clothing"

Be sure to look for web sites that aren’t providing cheap Halloween costumes. Shops providing clothes for historical reenactors are often very accurate.


Looking for Inspiration

There are many resources online for both historical and modern clothing. For historical clothing, you can look for web sites about the period, web sites for or about historical reenactors, or web pages for historical enthusiasts or museums. For modern clothing, you can simply pull up the web site of your favorite department store or clothing designer. Choose an outfit that works for your character, then learn how to describe the relevant parts.


Resources for Describing Clothing:

Describing Clothing
Describing Clothes
Writing Tips on Describing Clothes
Describing Clothes and Appearance (If You Should at All)


Resources for Garments and Accessories:

Shirts
Trousers 
Dress
Types of Dress
Shorts
Briefs
Panties
Lingerie
Bra
Swimsuit
Pajamas
Shoes
Coats and Jackets
Sweaters
Hats
Jewelry
Sunglasses
Sleeves, Necklines, Collars, and Dress Types
Scarves for Men
Scarf Buying Guide
The Ultimate Scarf Tying Guide



Historical Clothing Resources:

OMG That Dress!
Period Fabric
Amazon Dry Goods
Reconstructing History
Historic Threads
Historical Costume Inspiration
History of Costume: European Fashion Through the Ages
Women’s Fashion Through the Years
Clothing in the Ancient World
Clothing in Ancient Rome
Clothing in Biblical Times
Vintage Fashion Guild



Modern Clothing Resources:

Clothes on Pinterest
Polyvore
Fashion Dictionary
This is a Fashion Blog
What I Wore
Fashion is Endless


Physical Details Resources:

Women’s Body Shapes
Men’s Body Shapes
Face Shapes
Realistic Eye Shape Chart
Facial Hair Types
How to Describe Women’s Hair Lengths
The Ultimate Haircut Guide for Women
Men’s Haircuts (Barber Shop Style)
A Primer on Men’s Hairstyles
Hair Color
Obsidian Bookshelf Hair Color
Obsidian Bookshelf Eye Color
Skin Color Chart
Curl and Texture Chart

posted 3 weeks ago with 10197 notes (orig)
# writing   

argonianbot:

i dont think you guys appreciate how rad this site is 

because first of all you got your basic fantasy and game race names for like

everything

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BUT AS IF THAT ISN’T ENOUGH

REAL NAMES WHICH ARE GOOD FOR BOOKS

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AND THIS THERE’S MORE????

BAM, PLACE NAMES

image

AND STILL MORE

image

image

SO YOU SEE THESE LITTLE OPTIONS HERE

image

PLEASE, PLEASE

GO AND TRY TO HELP A GOOD PERSON OUT

posted 3 weeks ago with 108480 notes
# writing   
The Best Tumblrs for Writers to Follow

amandaeoliver:

I have been on Tumblr for nearly four years and steadily been finding great accounts related to writing. Thought I’d share some of my favorites for other writers or aspiring writers. 

  • GENERAL

The Electric Typewriter I am convinced that Dan, the curator of tetw, has found and neatly catalogued every good bit of writing on the internet. I could be wrong, but check for yourself.

Last Nights Reading Drawings by Kate Gavino with quotes from readings in New York City.

The Rumblr The Tumblr account for The Rumpus. Their posts, reblogs, gifs, and horoscopes by Madame Clairevoyant make me giddy ever time they come up on my dashboard.

Press 53 A publisher of short fiction and poetry collections based in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Their Poetry Wednesdays, Flash Fiction Fridays, and 53-story contests inspire many a sentence and story.

Penguin Classics From the editors of Penguin Books and Penguin Classics, they share quotes, photos, and, my personal favorite, Friday Final Lines. Every Friday, they offer the closing lines of a Penguin Classic.

The Paris Review Curated by their digital director Justin Alvarez, the quarterly literary magazine’s Tumblr is full of inspirational graphics and quotes that link to Paris Review articles, essays, and interviews well worth reading.

Button Poetry Even though they have only been around a little over a year, they consistently showcase new (and incredible) performance poets.

Yeah Write Everything creative writing related. Quotes, book lists, interesting articles and graphics

Electric Literatures Recommended Reading Recommended Reading is released on a four week curation cycle: beginning with a story chosen by Electric Literature, followed by an excerpt from an indie press, then an author recommendation, and finally a selection from a magazine’s archive. Each issue includes an editor’s note written by that week’s partner, introducing you to the work and their mission.

Black Balloon Publishing An independent press based out of New York City. They publish fiction, nonfiction, and memoir and “champion the weird, the unwieldy, and the unclassifiable.” They consistently publish great posts like Can You Identify the Handwriting of These 12 Famous Authors and Daddy Dearest: 10 Literary Fathers and Father Figures to be Glad Aren’t Your Own

Fwriction The online literary journal’s blog, “specializing in work that melts faces and rocks waffles.”

  • INSPIRATION

Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows Although the account hasn’t been updated in nearly 5 months, there are several years of archives with words and definitions John Koenig created for emotions that otherwise leave us speechless. 

Today’s Document A little history always gets the words flowing for me. The Tumblr for the U.S. National Archives posts one document daily. 

Hello You Creatives A collective of humans being creative. Inspiration, inspiration, inspiration.

Creative Mornings/Findings In a slump? Come here for photos, quotes, projects, and more from other creatives.

  • BOOK STORES

Strand Books Based in New York City

Powell’s Books Based in Portland, Oregon

Open Books Store Based in Chicago, Illinois

  • FREELANCE & PUBLISHING

Calls for Submissions for Writers and Poets 

Writing Opportunities

Freelancer Real Talk

  • RECOMMENDED READING:

Writers No One Reads

NPR Books

**I will continually be adding to the list

posted 4 weeks ago with 3107 notes (orig)
# writing   
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